Situated on the island of New Providence and attached by a bridge to legendary Paradise Island, Nassau brims with tropical sun, colonial history, and natural beauty. Beaches are close enough for bumming, but as the capital city of the Bahamas, Nassau itself is buzzing with cultural and culinary energy that begs to be explored.

01Stingray City

 Snorkeling with rays at Stingray City, Bahamas EXTREME-PHOTOGRAPHER / Getty Images

Getting up close and personal with stingrays is a nature lover's dream. Sting-free Southern Rays, which frequent the warm shallow waters around New Providence Island, are especially gentle. At Stingray City, a marine park just off-shore from Nassau at Stirrup Cay, you can snorkel and swim with rays during an hour-long encounter that includes feeding and photographing them.

02John Watling's Distillery

Rum cocktails in the Bahamas. Instants / Getty Images

Bahamian rum is world-famous and has a major narrative in the islands' colonial history. At the Buena Vista Estate in historic downtown Nassau, you will find John Watling's Distillery. Home to handcrafted dark rum and other local spirits, this distillery hosts tours and tastings of its potent products. There's a gift shop and an on-site tavern for further exploration of Bahamian rum culture.

03Aquaventure Water Park at Atlantis Paradise Island

 Tropical lagoon at Atlantis Aquaventure in the Bahamas. cristianl / Getty Images

Spread over 141 sprawling acres, Aquaventure Water Park is part of the world-famous Atlantis hospitality complex, which also features a 5-star hotel, a Tom Weiskopf-designed 18-hole golf course and casino. Some of Aquaventure's must-rides include a mile-long lazy river complete with rapids and wave surges, and the park's trademark Mayan-themed water slide. Private cabanas and 5 miles of white sand beaches make this the ultimate aquatic playground.

04Pirates of Nassau Museum

Pirate culture lives on at Nassau's Pirate Museum. stevegeer / Getty Images

Cheesy in the way only pirate culture can be, the immersive exhibits at the Pirates of Nassau Museum are housed within a replica pirate ship circa 1716. Located in historic downtown Nassau, the museum is a great introduction to the history of piracy in the Caribbean, Jack Sparrow notwithstanding. Real pirates such as Blackbeard and Charles Vane are the stuff of regional legend, but lesser-known female buccaneers Anne Bonny and Mary Read also get a hearing.

05National Art Gallery of the Bahamas

Sorry - couldn't find a good image for this one. snowdux / Getty Images

Housed in a restored 1860s colonial mansion called Villa Doyle, the National Art Gallery features Bahamian artists such as abstract expressionist Kendall Hanna and collagist John Cox. While mass-produced art is for sale on every street corner and beach around Nassau, at the National Gallery contemporary art sits comfortably beside traditionally executed paintings of Bahamian life.

06Arawak Cay

 Refreshing conch salad is a Nassau specialty. shalamov / Getty Images

Arawak Cay, or the Fish Fry as locals call it, is a gathering spot for Bahamians and tourists looking for an authentic Bahamian experience. Built on sand reclaimed by dredging Nassau Harbour, the Cay features inexpensive seafood casual dining, as well as special events and concerts. On Sunday evenings it's a great place to stroll after a gut-busting dinner of fried conch and other Bahamian goodies.

07Blue Lagoon Island

 Beach at Blue Lagoon Island near Nassau in the Bahamas. eyfoto / Getty Images

This popular day excursion in the Bahamas leaves from Nassau Harbour daily. A 10-minute speedboat ride away, Blue Lagoon Island—also known as Salt Cay—is a private island with a calm lagoon, white sand beaches, and the well-regarded Dolphin Encounters, an interactive program featuring dolphins and sea lions that you can swim beside and touch.

08Graycliff Estate

Native cacao is turned into fine chocolate at Graycliff. elkor / Getty Images

Graycliff is an elegant estate in downtown Nassau with a storied past and a delicious secret. Now a 5-star hotel and world-class restaurant, the main mansion was built by a pirate, Captain John Graysmith in 1740. It was Nassau's very first inn and the extensive grounds served as a base for the West Indian Regiment during the American Civil War. That delicious secret? The estate houses an on-site chocolate making facility, where guests can learn about the primary Caribbean export of cacao and sample handcrafted chocolate bonbons.

09Take a Bahamian food tour

Lobster is a staple of Nassau cuisine. Artit_Wongpradu / Getty Images

Foodies will find lots to love in Nassau. The Bahamian cuisine revolves around seafood, with conch and rock lobster on every menu at beach shacks; it also incorporates tropical fruits and dishes we might associate more with the American South, such as peas and rice. Bahamian beer is refreshing, as are local drinks like Switcha, made from local limes and lemons, and Sky Juice, a popular cocktail made with gin, coconut water, and condensed milk. Don't forget to try the islands' signature Bahama Mama, made from rum, grenadine, and pineapple juice.

10Cable Beach

The perfect colors of Cable Beach near Nassau in the Bahamas. TalbotImages / Getty Images

There are numerous public beaches within distance of Nassau via cab or jitney. One of the world's most famous is just a couple of miles to the west. The crescent-shaped Cable Beach is busy for sure, but it's the perfect spot soak up the sun with a locally brewed Sands or Kalik beer in hand or goggle at the luxury resorts and casinos set back from the sand.